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More Arab Women Studying STEM

For as long as she can remember, Amirah Ahmad Daghache has had a fascination with electronics and computer systems. As a child growing up in Saudi Arabia, Daghache did really well in math and says she was "the nerd that enjoyed doing her math homework."

Today, Daghache, a Palestinian-Canadian, is putting those math skills to use as a telecommunications engineering major at the Canadian University of Dubai.

Read more here!

Bridging the Gap for Top-Ranked Female Stem Students Requires Disruptive Strategies

Busting the myth that girls don't do science, technology, engineering or math (STEM), the release of the first ever national rankings of top science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) students by STEM-Premier reveals 23 of the top 50 students are female.
The students, representing all 50 states with STEM Premier profiles, were ranked and rated based on an algorithm of over 30 profile metrics including achievements, experiences and more.

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Innovation talk: What’s behind the lack of women in science and tech?

It is a constant struggle to bring more women into the Stem (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects and to keep them there, and not just at secondary level. And even when women do engage with these subjects there is a higher attrition rate for women leaving careers coming via Stem than for men.

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Innovation talk: What’s behind the lack of women in science and tech?

It is a constant struggle to bring more women into the Stem (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects and to keep them there, and not just at secondary level. And even when women do engage with these subjects there is a higher attrition rate for women leaving careers coming via Stem than for men.

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Why women are leaving the tech industry in droves

When I moved to the Bay Area in 2007 to run the Wikimedia Foundation, the first thing that struck me was the eerie absence of women. I'd spent most of my working life at the Canadian Broadcasting Corp., where we used to joke that women took power when the men went off to war in 1939, and afterward refused to give it back. At the CBC, easily half my colleagues, regardless of their gender, were overt, confident, unashamed feminists.

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The Untold History of Women in Science and Technology

Listen to women from across the Administration tell the stories of their personal heroes across the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). They were leaders in building the early foundation of modern programming and unveiled the structure of DNA. Their work inspired environmental movements and led to the discovery of new genes. They broke the sound barrier - and gender barriers along the way. And inspiring more young women to pursue careers in science starts with simply sharing their stories.

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Men Initiating Change Is An Important Step Toward Eradicating Tech’s Bro Culture

The conversation about women in tech is shifting as technology companies begin to hold themselves accountable. Recent moves, such as Google, Facebook, LinkedIn and Yahoo releasing their employee diversity numbers, show an intensified commitment to making real change for women technologists, but the sentiment is not industry-wide. We often hear from tech leadership that they would like to hire more women in technical roles, but they continue to reference the lack of women in the STEM pipeline as the cause. Deferring accountability will not affect real systematic change.

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This is how bad the gender gap is at tech companies

Looking over the diversity data released by major tech companies over the past several months paints a bleak picture of gender equality in the tech industry, as illustrated by this chart from Statista.

Women make up less than 40 percent of the workforce at Apple, Google, LinkedIn, Facebook, Yahoo and Twitter, and no more than one-fifth of the technical workforce at those companies. Non-technical employees at those companies are usually around 50 percent women, though Apple is an outlier in that regard with women only making up 35 percent of its non-technical workforce.

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30 Years Ago, Plenty Of Women Were In Computer Science. All That Changed In 1984.

30 Years Ago, Plenty Of Women Were In Computer Science. All That Changed In 1984. Listen to this NPR segment & read the transcript here.

Read more about this in another article here.

Twitter’s Diversity Report Is More Of The Same

Twitter released its diversity numbers on Wednesday afternoon after mounting pressure from civil rights groups — and they’re pretty bad if you’re not a white or Asian guy. Overall, Twitter’s employees are 70 percent male and 30 percent female. However when you look specifically at employees in tech, the gender gap grows, and 90 percent are male.

Read more about this on TechCrunch & Twitter.

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